I’m a Dietitian and yes, Imma eat that fucking burger!

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Let’s talk about something that I see coming up from time to time- the idea you need to look a certain way or eat certain foods if you talk to people about health, food, nutrition or exercise.

 I don’t know where this idea came from but it needs to die a very swift death. “Healthy” isn’t a look and it isn’t about eating some foods and not others. You earn the right to talk to people about their diet and exercise by studying and becoming certified or accredited, not because you are a gun in the gym, have a six pack or make pretty food to put up on Instagram.

 So lets get a few things straight, once and for all.

My diet does reflect my knowledge base, but not in the way you think

Throughout my 4.5 years of fulltime study on food, I might have pick up a thing or two to apply to my own eating habits.

 I don’t share specifics on the way I personally choose to eat because I am my own special little snowflake and I do what works for me which means the only person its good for is me. The way for you to best eat is going to look different to mine and that’s okay! That’s the whole point.

I do share some of my philosophies around food – like knowing that I can trust my internal feelings of hunger and fullness to guide my eating. I also know that no one food is going to make or break my diet, that there are no such thing as good and bad foods and that carbs are healthy.

 I don’t eat alkalizing foods as I know they can’t change the pH of my blood and I’m not into diets, meal plans or restriction because I know that in the long term they don’t work.

 I give my self permission to eat all foods and I eat mindfully (when I can, which is not all of the time!) and so far it’s working out pretty well for me.

 My body shape, size or fat percentage does not impact on my ability to practice as a Dietitian

 The normal body fat percentage for a female is 23%. Getting visible abs requires females to drop to a body fat percentage that is not healthy or sustainable in the long term.

Some people naturally fall on the slim side of the scale and some people do not. I’m not sure why anyone’s numerical relationship to gravity has any bearing on their actual intelligence so lets just let this go, eh?

 The way I look has nothing to do with my knowledge or my ability to be a “good” Dietitian

What even is a “good” dietitian? I’m a human first, Dietitian second. My dietetic ability lies in my certification and my commitment to yearly professional development to stay up to date on the latest research, not on whether I have visible abs.

 So, yes I eat burgers ( *gasp* sometimes from fast food joints) and cake (you can keep the lollies all to your self) and I also eat quinoa and sweet potato. I think my eating and movement habits are just fine and its not up to anyone else to tell me otherwise.

 If you work in the health, nutrition or fitness space embrace who you are, as you are now. Eat and move in a way that is right for you and let your body take care of it’s self. Humans naturally come in a wide variety of body shapes and sizes and despite what industry or society might tell you, one is not better than the other. People can be fat and healthy, and they can be skinny and not healthy. Slim and “toned” does not automatically mean healthy and it absolutely does not make one a food and exercise expert!

 If you find yourself passing judgment on how a health professional eats or exercises, stop and remind yourself of a few things:

  • It’s impossible to tell how healthy someone is just by looking at them
  • The way someone wishes to eat and exercise is none of your business
  • Shaming people into making better health choices will almost certainly backfire
  • It’s a choice to look after yourself, not a moral obligation
  • People can absolutely make the choice to not engage in healthy and helpful behaviors and this doesn’t make them less of a person

 Everyone deserves to eat and exercise free from judgment and that includes this dietitian! So let’s go grab a burger, please? But only the truly tasty kind 😉

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8 thoughts on “I’m a Dietitian and yes, Imma eat that fucking burger!

  1. Amy says:

    YES, Courtney, YES. My food intake is my food intake. Don’t base your own eating patterns on mine just because I’m a dietitian! No, I’m not perfect, I didn’t jump out of a text book, and no that guy in the gym harping on about protein shakes doesn’t know more about nutrition than I do just because he’s got a six pack! I love your insight, as always. Looking forward to more awesomeness in 2017!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. GlenysO says:

    The title alone made me want to share this! Haha! And YES the content is brilliant, too!! I do feel as though people judge me for being a fat dietitian. On the plus side, no one asks a fat dietitian how to lose weight, which is pretty nice!! (if only that were true; people still do ask me)

    Like

    • Courtney says:

      hehe I’m going for more eye catching titles – glad I hit the mark on this occasion! thanks for the feedback 🙂 I do wonder if size discrimination comes into it – you know maybe at stretch people can rationalize a “normal weight” dietitian eating a burger (they must have had a big workout this morning) but a fat one, well! Sadly, I think it would just confirm in their minds why that dietitian is the size that they are and how lazy they must be etc, etc when really it’s just a dang burger! #eyesonyourownplate
      As a society I wish we could all stop with the “well he has a six pack, clearly he knows heaps about nutrition”. It’s bull.

      Like

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